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April 01, 2009

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yanub

Poor Joe! I hate those tests where they make you have to have a full bladder. And then to be a small boy having his bladder filled by catheter without pain relief! No wonder he was traumatized and doesn't trust x-rays at all.

Deborah

I'm so impressed at Joe's eventual willingness to cooperate with all those strangers and all the tests. My Ashley freaks if we just approach the hospital ER, and must definitely be sedated. Unfortnuately, even the swaddling and nurse sitting are not enough to restrain her. She's one strong kiddo :)

Lisa Moon

OMG, poor Joe! How humiliating AND painful! :( Poor guy - no wonder he'd be terrified! I would be, too! In fact, I think I'm traumatised on his behalf! (Never said I wasn't tipping on the egde of some Spectrumness myself;) ).

But YAY for Mr Mea... I mean Marshmallow! How cool!

My son once hit the corner of a coffee table at a friends house. With his forehead, right between the eyes. They lived out of town, in a little 'boonie' community, where they have only a doc on call. She put a butterfly bandage over the gouge, thinking that would do the trick. I drove home and went right to the real ER at the hospital where they definitely wanted to put in stitches. Boy Child, however, was mightily freaked out by this point and very tired, not to mention having taken quite a whack to his *face*, which had to hurt. He didn't like the sound of 'stitches' sewing him together, so started to struggle. They brought in another doc, young, tall and sturdy, but not a gym-rat type. Anyway, they just pinned the poor little guy, despite my wishes to try and calm him a bit, and sewed him shut... while I uselessly tried to talk to him... and the blood ran into his eyes. EW.

Then, thankfully, it was done quite fast, and they let him go - while he still struggled and they said "Hey, bud! You're ok and done! Wanna popsicle?" He was all "Popsicle?!" That helped. Too bad doctors get-er-done didn't suggest that BEFORE the holding down part. :(

He wasn't too traumatised by that. It was a similar situation where the wanted to do a general anesthetic for dental work and he decided last minute he did NOT like the look of that gas mask... or the 'overly nice' docs and nurses who were not about to let me talk to him for a few minutes to calm him. Nooo, they said 'Mum! Help! And proceeded to hold him to they could get the IV in instead and I was trying to hold him, but soothe him and promised I'd be there when he woke...

Shit. I went outside and cried my face off. I hoped he wouldn't remember it.

When he came to later, I was there for him while he cried his way outta the anesthetic and took him home. A while later he said, tremulously, "Mommy? Why did you help them hold me down?" and I could have died in horror for him. :(

He was terrified of dentists from then on and it was only due to the ceiling TVs and headphones my dentist has (she's so great! VERY talented and skilled) that he could even get through a check-up.

Finally, he's gotten older and some years ago he was able to get a filling done after being told either the regular dentist did it or he'd get to 'go to sleep like before' to have it done. Smart boy chose to do it and he made it! Still hates it (well, who the heck likes mouth needles?!) but it's always angered me at the insesitivity shown by these professionals... and I wished I knew you then (of course, our kids are different ages, but you know); you definitely gave me some great ideas, like having a hand-out sheet explaining for medico types!

OK, sorry, done with super-comment and crying at those memories. Who was more traumatised, I sometimes wonder?!

Quirky Mom

Wow, that bladder test sounds really awful. And I worry that my Apple could easily have something like a UTI without telling me. The kid doesn't even know when she's hungry or thirsty. She just eats all the time and drinks when I make her.

I think I'm a little bit in love with Mr. Marshmallow. How wonderful to have found someone that worked so well with Joe! How sad that it wasn't that way for his bladder x-ray, or at least someone local to you that you could have the benefit of seeing the next time Joe needs an x-ray.

And what you mentioned about lidocaine and EDS -- I did not know that. But I know that every dentist that has ever paid attention has been shocked at how much it takes to numb me (and the ones who don't pay attention, well, I suffered through some very painful procedures).

One Sick Mother

Yanub,

Yes that experience was a bad one for Joe. We had the x-ray yesterday and he was amazed at how simple and uncomplicated a normal x-ray actually was! He got the all-clear BTW -no surprise there...

Deborah,

Yes, I was lucky in that Joe improved a lot with this stuff as he got older. Also we now have The Letter that we give to people beforehand, which makes a huge difference to how they perceive and treat him.

Lisa,

Yep. I think often the moms are more effected by this stuff, although yesterday Joe did demonstrate that he remembered that bladder x-ray very well.

QM,

It's kind of an occupational hazard with our kids that they can have something and not know/notice/tell. Grace once stood in a scalding bath. I grabbed her out just as she was about to sit. She didn't feel that it was too hot. With my kids, this improved vastly with time and OT.

I forgot to mention at the end, Mr Marshmallow told me that his mom works with Autistic kids. I guess that is why they sent him and not a different muscleman.


yep Lidocaine and EDS
http://www.ehlersdanlos.ca/localanaes.htm

also there is a study taking place in Holland.
http://www.trialregister.nl/trialreg/admin/rctview.asp?TC=1097

Europe -especially Northern Europe is a good place to look for EDS studies and data.

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