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October 31, 2008

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yanub

Wow, you have really got a handle on making sure Joe's doctor visits are relatively smooth. Did you have to figure all that out yourself?

One Sick Mother

Yanub,

Most of it is learned through bitter experience, -not all of it mine. I belong to an Autism Mom's messageboard (it is linked above). A few years ago, one of the moms there was ranting about a really tough ER visit with her son. A few of us thought -AFTER the fact that having a letter to hand would have been a good idea. Some of us actually went and wrote one.

A few weeks later, I had occasion to use mine, and the difference between my experience with the letter and her (and my) experience without made me a big believer in The Letter.

The other stuff was mostly from my own mistakes. I clearly remember the panic and frustration I felt when I got lost in the dark on the way to the Peds ER with my sick dehydrated baby crying the the back seat. I cursed myself then for not thinking to learn the way to the Peds ER in the daylight. We were lucky that time. She was fine, but I still feel ill when I think back to that trip.

OSM

Drake

That's very sensible!

As of late, that is untill I lost it in an MVA, I had resorted to handing my Medic-Alert bracelet to doctors in the ER. It's easier than trying to explain over the pains ;D.

My mom had similar, albeit to a lesser extent, difficulties with me at doctors ... and anywhere else for that matter. For some reason, I had severe seperation anxiety so my mom had to go everywhere with me.

In my case, I would have to sermise that it was due to being "misunderstood" and not being able to explain things...heck, I didn't even know my self that certain things werent "normal".

Lisa Moon

Wow, that's just brilliant! What an amazing, caring mom you are. This covers so many bases with great detail, yet briefly and most importantly, with great respect. Wonderful job!

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